STUDY DIARIES : Introduction

Over 20 years ago I was a parent of 2 young kids, and we wanted to find a decent pre-school provision that was more about creativity and play rather than about cramming kids heads with facts. My wife and I found a gem of a kindergarten that was run on Steiner principles and so impressed were we that we joined with the other impressed parents and got on with founding a Steiner lower school. I even became trustee Chair at the time!

But there was more to it for me than just the education of the children. I connected strongly to the underlying philosophy that Rudolf Steiner brought to the world. He had a different take on epistemology – or the theory of knowledge – i.e. how we come to know things, that very much resonated with how I felt about the world. For the past 20 years this has resulted in me studying – on & off, though more on than off – some of Steiner’s prodigious output.

It is this that I want to start blogging about now in these Study Diaries. I have been shy about this until now – primarily because Steiner covered some fairly tricky areas, namely the generation of what he called a spiritual science and what it had to say about a spiritual world and associated beings.

So I want to start by making it clear how my path has been into his work.

Initially Steiner was an expert on Goethe’s work and hence was asked to edit the Goethe archives at Weimar in 1888. As some of you will know from my previous posts about Goethe and phenomenology, it was Goethe who began raising warning flags about the problem of over-hypothesizing , something that has become endemic in our modern scientific method and something which badly affects those of us who work with modern technology.

It was from this philosophical foundation that Steiner started his work, coming out with his seminal book: The Philosophy of Freedom, which addressed the issues of being truly free in our thinking. He named this sort of freer thinking: “Living Thinking”, and he characterized it as a spiritual activity.

It was his philosophical work that attracted me first, along with his adamant stance that no one should just believe what he said. He wanted people to listen and consider for themselves what they could take on and understand. He was deeply uncomfortable with anyone who treated him as any sort of guru, and it was this that caught my imagination since it is congruent with his wish that people remain free in their thinking. Indeed a foundation of his ideas on ethics is that human morality is defined internally, not imposed externally, but more of that later.

Thus I have always felt that I could respect the man – despite there being a lot of his output that I cannot take on or understand. And this respect is something that has not changed over those 20 years as I have learnt more.

The studying I have been doing – usually on a Friday evening – has been on a very small percentage of Steiner’s work. Though it is the quality of the study that matters, not the quantity, and there is a very definite ‘holographic’ nature to it – i.e. it doesn’t matter which part you cover you can still get to the main ideas. I have also been working with someone I met during the early years of founding the local Steiner school and we have since become close friends as we have traveled on this study path together over the last two decades. I am no longer involved with the running of the school, though my friend is, since it quickly became apparent that understanding Steiner’s philosophical thought, so radically different as it is, was going to need some focused work.

It is worth noting that Steiner touched many areas of human endeavour, I consider in a positive way, though of course there are some detractors who would contest that. Such areas have included: Education, Medicine, Architecture, the Arts, Social reform and Economics to name a few.

I have decided to start writing about this aspect of my life, and you are welcome to read along or not, but I must mention the initial disclaimer that, although I am not a religious person and do not go to church, I do think we have a spiritual aspect to our nature. Now in my experience this is not something you can prove or disprove, you either can go with it or not. If not, then perhaps these Study Diaries will not be for you.

But all I would ask is that you hold an open mind and – just as Steiner would wish – take on only what makes sense to you. Hopefully, in whatever small way, you might even find something helpful in the Diaries.

Thanks for reading.

6 thoughts on “STUDY DIARIES : Introduction

  1. I look forward to following this series. While I wouldn’t describe myself as spiritual I do have what I consider an artistic sensibility for the aesthetic beauty to be found in connections and the patterns underlying aspects of environment and existence.

    • Thank you Alex. I had started from the same point with regard to anything called ‘spiritual’ and I think it is Steiner’s approach that has somewhat redeemed the term for me. From where I am now I would call it a whole perception of the world, encompassing both the analytical and the artistic, but also definitely having the viewpoint that we have finer aspects to our being and are much more than just material vessels. You can see why it has taken me a while to ‘come out’ with this! Lets see how it goes. I hope I can do the subject justice.

      I hope you and yours are well.
      All the best
      Charles

    • Hello Sarah, You are welcome, and I must say I am very impressed by your blog too. Though I have never really been a horse person (though my father was very much so), maybe that will change as I read it!
      Thank you for following. Just going back through Steiner’s Truth & Knowledge at the moment to get a handle on doing a precis. All the best.

      • Thank Charles – my area of interest is the human-animal relationship (and yes, primarily with horses although all animals ultimately). As most of materialistic science it too is approached from a reductionist, analytical methodology instead of synergistic (or holographic as Bortoft put it). My hope is to infuse this relatively new discipline with this ‘other’ way of seeing (there is a great deal of misunderstanding of animal), and doing so necessitates the understanding of human from with Steiner’s science, then we can truly begin to know animal and what animal really does mean to human. So your work (and that of others) permeates probably far more than you ever imagined! 🙂

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